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As any good printer or designer knows, finishing your promotional materials in the right way can change the whole perception of the product or service you offer. This is never more true, than with your brochures.

How you choose to bind your brochure depends on a few variables, such as quantity produced, number of pages, finishing options etc. Here is our guide to each, its benefits, drawbacks and requirements.

Here is some useful information on binding techniques that can be used for your brochure.

binding

Perfect Binding

Perfect Binding involves gluing the pages into the cover using ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) adhesives. This print binding method is a cost effective for a lightweight brochure. It is suitable for high numbers of pages on relatively lightweight, coated or uncoated papers. The pages are folded into sections of 8 or 16. These sections are then lined up next to each other within the spine of the cover. EVA adhesive is added, which then adheres the sections together, and secures them into the spine.

This binding method is especially suited to large, thread sewn books due to the thickness of the adhesive offering greater penetration into the sections within the spine area. These brochures tend not to “lay flat” when opened, similar to a paperback book.

PUR Binding

PUR Binding involves gluing the pages into the cover using polyurethane reactive adhesives (PUR). This works in the same way as Perfect Binding, however, is more expensive. PUR Binding is suitable for medium to high numbers of pages. It can, however, be used on heavier and uv-coated materials. Using slightly less adhesive than Perfect Binging, a spine can be thinner and will also “lay flat”. Durability tests have indicated that PUR binding can be 30 – 40% longer lasting that Perfect Binding.

Especially suited to magazines, brochures and glossy materials, this process of binding can achieve a square spine on even the thinnest of books.

Saddle Stitched

In reality, this is just stapling. Saddle Stitching possibly derived its name from the method of placing the folded, flat brochure over the machine, like a saddle on a horse, then punching the staples in.

This is the most cost effective method of binding, however, it is only suitable for a low to medium number of pages. The process normally uses two or three staples or “wires” running up the length of the spine.

Unlike Perfect or PUR binding, no sections are used. Pages are laid flat or “open” on top of the covers in a stack, folded to form the spine, then staples are pushed through all the pages from the outside of the covers. This binds the whole booklet together.

So to make sure your brochure binding projects the right message, talk to us today. With our expertise, we can help you pick the best binding method for your next brochure.

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